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Delhi bans BS3 Petrol, BS4 Diesel Vehicles; know why?

The government of Delhi banned BS3 Petrol, BS4 Diesel vehicles


The government of Delhi temporarily banned the use of BS3 petrol and BS4 diesel vehicles in the nation’s capital on Monday to reduce air pollution levels after the city’s air quality once again worsened. Due to unfavourable conditions, including calm breezes and low temperatures, the Commission for Air Quality Management (CAQM) instructed all NCR states to intensify their implementation of anti-pollution controls.

The temporary ban will be in place from this Tuesday through next Friday. As something similar occurred before the end of 2022, this is not the first time the Delhi Government has implemented strict temporary measures.

“The ban on BS-III petrol and BS-IV diesel vehicles will kick in from Tuesday since the air quality has deteriorated in the severe category. We are monitoring the situation along with the Environment department. For now, the ban is likely to be in place till Friday. If the air quality improves, the ban could be lifted before Friday,” said a senior Transport department official.

It is concerning that Delhi’s air quality index (AQI) dropped below 400, which is regarded as “severe.” Given that stage III of the Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP) is already in place. That construction work is temporarily banned in the capital city, and the situation is considered concerning.

With the creation of thick fog and the extremely cold days that Delhi has been experiencing, visibility in the capital region has dropped to an all-time low. A notification from Delhi’s transport department suggests that BS-III gasoline and BS-IV diesel vehicles are now banned. The ban will be lifted on Friday after being watched over.

Under Stage III of the updated GRAP and Section 115 of the Motor Vehicles Act of 1988, the ban on BS-III petrol and BS-IV diesel vehicles was enacted. Vehicles used for emergency, law enforcement, and government services are exempt from the restriction. The Motor Vehicles Act of 1988’s section 194(1) would be used to prosecute violators who are discovered breaking this temporary prohibition, according to the Delhi transport department. The violator is subject to a fine of Rs 20,000 under this act.

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Under Stage III of the updated GRAP and Section 115 of the Motor Vehicles Act of 1988, the ban on BS-III petrol and BS-IV diesel vehicles was enacted. Vehicles used for emergency, law enforcement, and government services are exempt from the restriction. The Motor Vehicles Act of 1988’s section 194(1) would be used to prosecute violators who are discovered breaking this temporary prohibition, according to the Delhi transport department. The violator is subject to a fine of Rs 20,000 under this act.

At 4 p.m. on Monday, the national capital’s 24-hour average air quality index (AQI), which had been at 371 on Sunday, was now at 434.

An AQI of 201 to 300 is regarded as “poor,” 301 to 400 as “extremely poor,” and 401 to 500 as “severe.”

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Tamkeenat Rose

A hodophiIe shutterbug and I am here to tell you interesting stories backed with proper information.
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